Have you come across restrictive repair disclaimers from manufacturers?

In the thread on repairing a Dualit toaster, @janet pointed to news of the (recently?) updated terms in the Dualit’s website and repair instructions supplied with spare parts they sell, stating that:

Full fitting instructions will be supplied with replacement elements.
Please ensure all servicing (including the fitting of replacement elements) is carried out by a qualified electrician.

see here for example: https://www.dualit.com/support/2-sandwich/spares

Elsewhere in the FAQs, they use both a lighter and stronger wording in the same document (emphasis mine):

Spare timers are available from www.dualit.com and must be fitted by a qualified electrical engineer.

Fitting a new timer is a simple procedure but should only be done by a competent electrician

Meanwhile, for their classic toasters, manufactured in the UK, they supply key spare parts and repair information (when you buy the part) - which is better in terms of Right to Repair, than some of their competitors.

Have you come across other similar messaging by other companies? I wonder whether we will see more of this if manufacturers are required to make more parts available in the future, and whether this wording is considered a “safe” trade-off by manufacturers in reducing their liabilities for repairers not performed by their engineers or another professional.

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Yes quite common … my favourite is “no user serviceable parts”.
That just prompts me to open it if it doesn’t work!

This may help (glass in hand!!):
https://www.ukwhitegoods.co.uk/help/buying-advice/all-appliances/255-helpadvice/spare-parts-for-appliances/general-spare-part-help/3473-appliance-spare-parts-and-the-law

…but then again it may not :exploding_head:

Basically they are saying, you buy it, you fit it, and it’s your responsibility whatever happens :grinning:

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